Shadow of the Giants

We, like many of you, are blessed to live an area rich in nature's wonders.  A day trip (on a Saturday) was planned for the youth to experience the wonder!
*
We visited the "Shadow of the Giants" trail at Nelder Grove, in California.
*
*
PURPOSE
Enjoy nature.  Build friendships.  Opportunity to teach.
*
ACTIVITY
easy hike along forest trail
picnic (each youth brought their own)
lesson, using the surroundings
*
LESSON
Our Bishop spent the day with the youth.  At one point he asked that everyone gather at the base of one of the great sequoia trees.  He then taught us all about the trees root system.  These are not his exact words, but close enough to get the point across, I hope.  :)
*
By most standards of measurement, the largest (and oldest) trees in the world are the Giant Redwoods.  They can grow as tall as 275 feet. That is nearly the height of the Statue of Liberty.
*
The roots of the Giant Redwood are not particularly deep. They reach down only about 3-5 feet. Most of the roots are quite thin, as well. That doesn't seem like a great formula for sustaining the largest living thing on the face of the earth, does it?
*
Standing alone, these trees do not do well all by themselves.  The secret to the effectiveness of the Giant Redwood’s root system lies in a remarkable feature. Giant Redwoods come from the Sequoia family. Sequoias grow in groves, which we happen to be standing in the middle of.  These trees actually have a shared root system. The roots of Sequoias (Giant Redwoods included) are intertwined. One complex root system feeds and supports all of the trees in a given grove. They grow taller, straighter, stronger, and produce better lumber.  And that root system has proven to be wildly successful.
*
We are not all that different from these Sequoia trees. Often, the successes that others can see really are sustained by those qualities that rest “below the surface”.  Our greatest strength comes as we root ourselves in the gospel, and hold fast to those things our Heavenly Father has blessed us with.  Family and good friends who support us - and we support them.  Together we can stand strong against the storms and winds of life.
*
ADDITIONAL RESOURCES
"Web of Friendship", Liahona, August 2003 
"Growing Strong Together", Liahona, December 1991 (reference to Relief Society)
Seminary Video
*
*
On the way back, we stopped at Robert's Frosty in Corsegold, for one of the best soft served ice cream cones I've had in a long time.  Made me think of Timp Freeze in Midway, Utah (which to our dismay is now closed).
*
*
We also took in a classic car show and a few local antique shops.  They happened to be right across the street from our ice cream stop.  Lucky!
*

2 comments:

  1. It's not called the Timp Freeze anymore, but it's back open and yummy as ever! Come to Heber Valley for a visit! Thanks for this wonderful post, it is exactly what I needed to make my YW's hike fantastic tonight! We don't have redwoods here in Midway, but we do have LOTS of aspen trees. Aspen's also grow in groves and use the same root system. Thanks for a fabulous site. This brand new Pres will be checking in lots!

    ReplyDelete
  2. We were able to go back to Utah twice this past couple months. I was so excited to see that Timp Freeze had opened it's doors again. Love the makeover! :) We went twice - after we jumped in the Crater at Homestead and again during Swiss Days! My favorite thing about that place is the little plastic figurines they place on top of their cones. I am sure I still have a few of those from 30 years ago. :)

    By the way, my husband is very aware that if we ever move back to Utah... Midway is where I want to live. :)

    ReplyDelete